eCann Partners With Eden Reforestation Projects Leave a comment

In partnership with the Eden Reforestation Projects, eCann is committed to planting one tree for every order placed on the platform and one tree for every review left on a product. This allows each customer to contribute two trees back to our ecosystem for every order they place on the platform, no matter how small the item is. 

In a world where leading marketplaces favour convenience over morality, lining the pockets of billionaires whilst exploiting its staff and our environment, eCann is committed to using its growth to channel positivity back to its community.
Planting trees is just the first step in our greater mission to make our world a better place. We hope that through the platform’s success, eCann will have the opportunity to have a positive impact on all aspects of our life, such as our environment, our health, and our wellbeing.

To celebrate its new partnership with Eden, eCann has begun its journey by contributing 1,000 trees back into our rainforests.  

About The Eden Reforestation Projects

Eden Reforestation Projects (Eden) is a non-profit organisation established in California that seeks to decrease extreme poverty and restore healthy forests in developing countries. Thousands of local villagers are employed by the organisation, which gives them the jobs, education, and tools they need to plant, grow, and safeguard millions of trees each year.
Each month, Eden plants about 12,000,000 trees. In June 2020, Eden reached a milestone of producing 333 million trees, and by 2025, Eden hopes to have grown a minimum of 500 million trees every year. Eden gives a life-changing wage to tens of thousands of people living in impoverished countries. Eden presently has operations in Madagascar, Haiti, Nepal, Indonesia, Mozambique, Kenya, Honduras, and Nicaragua, to name a few.

Eden targets high-priority places suffering from deforestation and extreme poverty and have biological assets that are recognised across the world.
The initiatives provide local communities with life-changing economic possibilities while also maintaining biodiversity, mitigating climate change, and delivering a wide range of other social and environmental advantages—a quick summary of the countries involved in their initiative.

Nepal

Nepal is a diversified country with stunning snow-capped mountains in the north and scorching tropical climates in the south.

Southerly planes, magnificent and diverse landscapes, and beautiful animals More than 700 kinds of animals may be found in Chitwan National Park alone, including leopards and the elusive Bengal tiger. It is also home to a diverse range of cultures linked by a deep bond with nature, which have remained largely untouched by most of the socioeconomic growth experienced in metropolitan areas while facing considerably higher environmental risks, maintaining high levels of inequality.

Eden launched its Nepal Reforestation Project in 2014 to improve local livelihoods and restore forests in critical places. The planting locations are positioned around Community Forests in the hilly Nawalparasi District, along lowland alluvial plains in the Jhapa, Rautahat, Morang Districts, and surrounding Chitwan National Park to create a buffer zone surrounding this national biological gem.

Madagascar

Deforestation has long been a problem in Madagascar, one of the world’s top biodiversity conservation priorities, due to its high concentration of unique species and rapid habitat loss rates. Mangrove degradation in the coastal zone destabilises the shoreline, making coastal populations more vulnerable to storms and other weather events that are growing more often and violent due to human-induced climate change. Deforestation threatens one of the world’s rarest and most diversified forest systems in highland dry deciduous forests.

Eden launched the Madagascar Reforestation Project in 2007 in response to the widespread loss of mangroves and upland forests in Madagascar and has already planted more than 300 million mangrove and dry deciduous trees.

Eden Reforestation Projects reforests enormous areas of mangrove and dry deciduous forests along the coast and interior with the help of many diverse people and the full cooperation of national, municipal, and tribal governments.

Indonesia

Because of the diverse variety of species it supports, including at least 500 species of reef-building corals, West Papua, Indonesia, is acknowledged as the world hub of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation. Biak Island is one of Indonesia’s poorest regions, with subsistence farmers and fishers accounting for around 75% of the population.

Eden Reforestation Projects launched a reforestation initiative in Indonesia in late 2017 to restore mangroves and tropical forests while also promoting food security by assisting locals in planting agroforestry plants. Eden’s planting activities have swiftly increased as the leadership team mobilises local leaders and recruits planters to join the programme. The organisation currently operates on many isolated islands (Biak, Yapan, and Seram) and the mainland of West Papua.

Kenya

Eden Reforestation Projects works in Kenya’s 5,000-hectare Kijabe Forest, which is protected. The Kijabe Forest is situated in a diverse and dynamic environment. The forest grows on the high borders of the Great Rift Valley, around 1.5 hours from Nairobi, Kenya’s capital. This forest, which formerly housed herds of buffalo, leopards, and elephants, is now a critical habitat and wildlife corridor. Animals utilise this corridor to travel between the Rift Valley’s dry bottom and the Kenyan highlands’ remote, lush forests. The forest distributes water to local towns and the country as a whole as part of one of Kenya’s five nationally significant water towers. The forest has been cut for charcoal and wood over the last 15 years, decreasing the number of permanent rivers from the woods from eight to one. Rains have also grown inconsistent, Catastrophic landslides have claimed lives and destroyed critical infrastructure, and people’s livelihood choices have been harmed. Ask anybody in the forest about the effects of deforestation.

Eden works to restore this vital forest in collaboration with a local forest trust, the Kijabe Forest Trust, local and national government agencies, and the neighbouring agricultural and pastoral communities. Protecting and replanting near springs and rivers, restoring animal habitat, stabilising steep slopes prone to landslides, and preserving livelihoods are all part of our efforts to re-establish a sustainable water supply.

Mozambique

Eden Reforestation Projects launched the Maputo Bay Reforestation Initiative in response to the widespread loss of mangroves in Mozambique to restore the vitality of the forests that border the rivers and shoreline of Maputo Bay in southern Mozambique. The initiative helps local people establish and maintain mangrove forests, providing long-term jobs and improved livelihoods while also safeguarding the essential species that depend on mangrove forests for survival. The Katembe and Madjuva planting sites in Maputo kicked up the initiative in October 2018. Since then, the project has grown to encompass many other mangrove sites and two additional terrestrial locations.

Eden’s work in Mozambique aims to protect coastal communities from natural catastrophes, boost fisheries, remove carbon from the atmosphere and promote biodiversity, all while addressing poverty reduction and women’s empowerment.

Haiti

By establishing agroforestry systems that protect watersheds and promote food security, the Haiti Reforestation Project restores tree cover and improves food security. Local farmers are given the knowledge, equipment, and trees they need to plan their plots, grow and care for their trees, and boost their farms’ food output and biodiversity. In addition, in 2020, Eden started a large-scale mangrove restoration project.

Eden Reforestation Projects works in Haiti to improve the way people produce food by installing agroforestry systems that include various fruit and nut species and trees that supply lumber, fuelwood, and habitat. Local farmers will be trained to grow land in highland areas that do not react well to intensive agriculture and are best suited for agroforestry applications.

The Haiti Reforestation Project helps to stabilise the ground, increase soil fertility and moisture retention, increase production of fruits and other agriculture products that can be sold domestically and internationally, increasing household income while restoring the natural ecological function of a highly degraded landscape.

Honduras

Honduras has Central American Montane Forests, Central American Pine-oak Forests, Northern Mangroves, and Central American Dry Forests, making it a biodiverse country. Hundreds of terrestrial, freshwater and marine animal and plant species call the nation home, some of which are found nowhere else on the planet.

Honduras is home to twenty national parks, two biosphere reserves, and dozens of smaller reserves dedicated to preserving the region’s most wooded areas and hundreds of unique species. Forests throughout the country are threatened by uncontrolled logging, particularly for the foreign market and land clearance for agriculture.

Honduras is a major producer of palm oil, which has resulted in widespread deforestation, even in so-called “protected” regions. Honduras had the most significant rate of forest cover loss, with a staggering 37 percent reduction between 1990 and 2005. Between 2013 and 2018, natural forests in Honduras lost 96 percent of their tree cover.

In early 2020, Eden Reforestation Projects will begin a project in Honduras to help develop, plant and preserve forests in biodiverse hotspots around the nation. Eden’s “Employ to Plant” programme will provide economic opportunity to highly disadvantaged populations whose access to resources and capacity to live sustainably off the land has been harmed by deforestation.

Nicaragua

This Central American nation’s tropical and subtropical woods include wet broadleaf forests, dry broadleaf forests, and coniferous forests. It supports mangrove ecosystems, wet rainforests, cloud forests, dwarf forests, tropical dry forests, freshwater habitats, and marine ecoregions on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Nicaragua features 24 volcanoes, each with its microclimate, allowing for the flourishing of diverse flora and wildlife. Over a thousand species of birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles call this varied area home. It’s also a critical nesting area for numerous endangered sea turtle species that can’t find another place to lay their eggs.

The Onetepe Biosphere Reserve, located near Lake Nicaragua, the region’s biggest lake, is another critical biodiversity hotspot. Over 170 species of resident and migratory birds, some of which are endangered, call this one reserve home. There are 78 natural reserves, parks, and animal sanctuaries in Nicaragua. Even protected regions in this nation are unfortunately subject to high levels of poaching and destruction. Illegal logging, poaching, mining, and growth of farming and grazing primarily for export are all factors driving deforestation in Costa Rica.

We are now in the process of bringing our approach to Nicaragua. We aim to partner with local farmers to build initiatives that offer reforestation and economic prospects for underprivileged families in this biodiverse country.

In partnership with the Eden Reforestation Projects, eCann is committed to planting one tree for every order placed on the platform and one tree for every review left on a product. This allows each customer to contribute two trees back to our ecosystem for every order they place on the platform, no matter how small the item is. 

In a world where leading marketplaces favour convenience over morality, lining the pockets of billionaires whilst exploiting its staff and our environment, eCann is committed to using its growth to channel positivity back to its community.
Planting trees is just the first step in our greater mission to make our world a better place.

We hope that through the platform’s success, eCann will have the opportunity to have a positive impact on all aspects of our life, such as our environment, our health, and our wellbeing.

To celebrate its new partnership with Eden, eCann has begun its journey by contributing 1,000 trees back into our rainforests.  

About The Eden Reforestation Projects

Eden Reforestation Projects (Eden) is a non-profit organisation established in California that seeks to decrease extreme poverty and restore healthy forests in developing countries. Thousands of local villagers are employed by the organisation, which gives them the jobs, education, and tools they need to plant, grow, and safeguard millions of trees each year.
Each month, Eden plants about 12,000,000 trees. In June 2020, Eden reached a milestone of producing 333 million trees, and by 2025, Eden hopes to have grown a minimum of 500 million trees every year. Eden gives a life-changing wage to tens of thousands of people living in impoverished countries. Eden presently has operations in Madagascar, Haiti, Nepal, Indonesia, Mozambique, Kenya, Honduras, and Nicaragua, to name a few.

Eden targets high-priority places suffering from deforestation and extreme poverty and have biological assets that are recognised across the world.
The initiatives provide local communities with life-changing economic possibilities while also maintaining biodiversity, mitigating climate change, and delivering a wide range of other social and environmental advantages—a quick summary of the countries involved in their initiative.

Nepal

Nepal is a diversified country with stunning snow-capped mountains in the north and scorching tropical climates in the south.

Southerly planes, magnificent and diverse landscapes, and beautiful animals More than 700 kinds of animals may be found in Chitwan National Park alone, including leopards and the elusive Bengal tiger. It is also home to a diverse range of cultures linked by a deep bond with nature, which have remained largely untouched by most of the socioeconomic growth experienced in metropolitan areas while facing considerably higher environmental risks, maintaining high levels of inequality.

Eden launched its Nepal Reforestation Project in 2014 to improve local livelihoods and restore forests in critical places. The planting locations are positioned around Community Forests in the hilly Nawalparasi District, along lowland alluvial plains in the Jhapa, Rautahat, Morang Districts, and surrounding Chitwan National Park to create a buffer zone surrounding this national biological gem.

Madagascar

Deforestation has long been a problem in Madagascar, one of the world’s top biodiversity conservation priorities, due to its high concentration of unique species and rapid habitat loss rates. Mangrove degradation in the coastal zone destabilises the shoreline, making coastal populations more vulnerable to storms and other weather events that are growing more often and violent due to human-induced climate change. Deforestation threatens one of the world’s rarest and most diversified forest systems in highland dry deciduous forests.

Eden launched the Madagascar Reforestation Project in 2007 in response to the widespread loss of mangroves and upland forests in Madagascar and has already planted more than 300 million mangrove and dry deciduous trees.

Eden Reforestation Projects reforests enormous areas of mangrove and dry deciduous forests along the coast and interior with the help of many diverse people and the full cooperation of national, municipal, and tribal governments.

Indonesia

Because of the diverse variety of species it supports, including at least 500 species of reef-building corals, West Papua, Indonesia, is acknowledged as the world hub of marine biodiversity and a global priority for conservation. Biak Island is one of Indonesia’s poorest regions, with subsistence farmers and fishers accounting for around 75% of the population.

Eden Reforestation Projects launched a reforestation initiative in Indonesia in late 2017 to restore mangroves and tropical forests while also promoting food security by assisting locals in planting agroforestry plants. Eden’s planting activities have swiftly increased as the leadership team mobilises local leaders and recruits planters to join the programme. The organisation currently operates on many isolated islands (Biak, Yapan, and Seram) and the mainland of West Papua.

Kenya

Eden Reforestation Projects works in Kenya’s 5,000-hectare Kijabe Forest, which is protected. The Kijabe Forest is situated in a diverse and dynamic environment. The forest grows on the high borders of the Great Rift Valley, around 1.5 hours from Nairobi, Kenya’s capital. This forest, which formerly housed herds of buffalo, leopards, and elephants, is now a critical habitat and wildlife corridor. Animals utilise this corridor to travel between the Rift Valley’s dry bottom and the Kenyan highlands’ remote, lush forests. The forest distributes water to local towns and the country as a whole as part of one of Kenya’s five nationally significant water towers. The forest has been cut for charcoal and wood over the last 15 years, decreasing the number of permanent rivers from the woods from eight to one. Rains have also grown inconsistent, Catastrophic landslides have claimed lives and destroyed critical infrastructure, and people’s livelihood choices have been harmed. Ask anybody in the forest about the effects of deforestation.

Eden works to restore this vital forest in collaboration with a local forest trust, the Kijabe Forest Trust, local and national government agencies, and the neighbouring agricultural and pastoral communities. Protecting and replanting near springs and rivers, restoring animal habitat, stabilising steep slopes prone to landslides, and preserving livelihoods are all part of our efforts to re-establish a sustainable water supply.

Mozambique

Eden Reforestation Projects launched the Maputo Bay Reforestation Initiative in response to the widespread loss of mangroves in Mozambique to restore the vitality of the forests that border the rivers and shoreline of Maputo Bay in southern Mozambique. The initiative helps local people establish and maintain mangrove forests, providing long-term jobs and improved livelihoods while also safeguarding the essential species that depend on mangrove forests for survival. The Katembe and Madjuva planting sites in Maputo kicked up the initiative in October 2018. Since then, the project has grown to encompass many other mangrove sites and two additional terrestrial locations.

Eden’s work in Mozambique aims to protect coastal communities from natural catastrophes, boost fisheries, remove carbon from the atmosphere and promote biodiversity, all while addressing poverty reduction and women’s empowerment.

Haiti

By establishing agroforestry systems that protect watersheds and promote food security, the Haiti Reforestation Project restores tree cover and improves food security. Local farmers are given the knowledge, equipment, and trees they need to plan their plots, grow and care for their trees, and boost their farms’ food output and biodiversity. In addition, in 2020, Eden started a large-scale mangrove restoration project.

Eden Reforestation Projects works in Haiti to improve the way people produce food by installing agroforestry systems that include various fruit and nut species and trees that supply lumber, fuelwood, and habitat. Local farmers will be trained to grow land in highland areas that do not react well to intensive agriculture and are best suited for agroforestry applications.

The Haiti Reforestation Project helps to stabilise the ground, increase soil fertility and moisture retention, increase production of fruits and other agriculture products that can be sold domestically and internationally, increasing household income while restoring the natural ecological function of a highly degraded landscape.

Honduras

Honduras has Central American Montane Forests, Central American Pine-oak Forests, Northern Mangroves, and Central American Dry Forests, making it a biodiverse country. Hundreds of terrestrial, freshwater and marine animal and plant species call the nation home, some of which are found nowhere else on the planet.

Honduras is home to twenty national parks, two biosphere reserves, and dozens of smaller reserves dedicated to preserving the region’s most wooded areas and hundreds of unique species. Forests throughout the country are threatened by uncontrolled logging, particularly for the foreign market and land clearance for agriculture.

Honduras is a major producer of palm oil, which has resulted in widespread deforestation, even in so-called “protected” regions. Honduras had the most significant rate of forest cover loss, with a staggering 37 percent reduction between 1990 and 2005. Between 2013 and 2018, natural forests in Honduras lost 96 percent of their tree cover.

In early 2020, Eden Reforestation Projects will begin a project in Honduras to help develop, plant and preserve forests in biodiverse hotspots around the nation. Eden’s “Employ to Plant” programme will provide economic opportunity to highly disadvantaged populations whose access to resources and capacity to live sustainably off the land has been harmed by deforestation.

Nicaragua

This Central American nation’s tropical and subtropical woods include wet broadleaf forests, dry broadleaf forests, and coniferous forests. It supports mangrove ecosystems, wet rainforests, cloud forests, dwarf forests, tropical dry forests, freshwater habitats, and marine ecoregions on both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. Nicaragua features 24 volcanoes, each with its microclimate, allowing for the flourishing of diverse flora and wildlife. Over a thousand species of birds, mammals, amphibians, and reptiles call this varied area home. It’s also a critical nesting area for numerous endangered sea turtle species that can’t find another place to lay their eggs.


The Onetepe Biosphere Reserve, located near Lake Nicaragua, the region’s biggest lake, is another critical biodiversity hotspot. Over 170 species of resident and migratory birds, some of which are endangered, call this one reserve home. There are 78 natural reserves, parks, and animal sanctuaries in Nicaragua. Even protected regions in this nation are unfortunately subject to high levels of poaching and destruction. Illegal logging, poaching, mining, and growth of farming and grazing primarily for export are all factors driving deforestation in Costa Rica.

We are now in the process of bringing our approach to Nicaragua. We aim to partner with local farmers to build initiatives that offer reforestation and economic prospects for underprivileged families in this biodiverse country.

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